BERT HOWE
  • Nationwide: (800) 482-1822    
    multi family housing Building Consultant Alberta Virginia concrete tilt-up Building Consultant Alberta Virginia hospital construction Building Consultant Alberta Virginia custom home Building Consultant Alberta Virginia housing Building Consultant Alberta Virginia office building Building Consultant Alberta Virginia structural steel construction Building Consultant Alberta Virginia condominium Building Consultant Alberta Virginia condominiums Building Consultant Alberta Virginia production housing Building Consultant Alberta Virginia landscaping construction Building Consultant Alberta Virginia low-income housing Building Consultant Alberta Virginia Subterranean parking Building Consultant Alberta Virginia mid-rise construction Building Consultant Alberta Virginia tract home Building Consultant Alberta Virginia casino resort Building Consultant Alberta Virginia parking structure Building Consultant Alberta Virginia institutional building Building Consultant Alberta Virginia townhome construction Building Consultant Alberta Virginia industrial building Building Consultant Alberta Virginia high-rise construction Building Consultant Alberta Virginia Medical building Building Consultant Alberta Virginia
    Alberta Virginia roofing construction expertAlberta Virginia construction expertsAlberta Virginia building envelope expert witnessAlberta Virginia expert witness structural engineerAlberta Virginia construction claims expert witnessAlberta Virginia consulting architect expert witnessAlberta Virginia construction code expert witness
    Arrange No Cost Consultation
    Building Consultant Builders Information
    Alberta, Virginia

    Virginia Builders Right To Repair Current Law Summary:

    Current Law Summary: (HB558; H 150; §55-70.1) Warranty extension applicable to single-family but not HOAs: in addition to any other express or implied warranties; It requires registered or certified mail notice to "vendor" stating nature of claim; reasonable time not to exceed six months to "cure the defect".


    Building Consultant Contractors Licensing
    Guidelines Alberta Virginia

    A contractor's license is required for all trades. Separate boards license plumbing, electrical, HVAC, gas fitting, and asbestos trades.


    Building Consultant Contractors Building Industry
    Association Directory
    Tidewater Builders Association
    Local # 4854
    2117 Smith Ave
    Chesapeake, VA 23320

    Alberta Virginia Building Consultant 10/ 10

    Peninsula Housing & Builders Association
    Local # 4844
    760 McGuire Pl
    Newport News, VA 23601

    Alberta Virginia Building Consultant 10/ 10

    Home Builders Association of Southside VA
    Local # 4863
    10300 Corporate Road
    Petersburg, VA 23805

    Alberta Virginia Building Consultant 10/ 10

    New River Valley Home Builders Association
    Local # 4837
    PO Box 2010
    Christiansburg, VA 24068

    Alberta Virginia Building Consultant 10/ 10

    Builders & Associates of Southern VA
    Local # 4829
    PO Box 10178 Ste 28
    Danville, VA 24543
    Alberta Virginia Building Consultant 10/ 10

    Roanoke Regional Home Builders Association
    Local # 4881
    1626 Apperson Dr
    Salem, VA 24153

    Alberta Virginia Building Consultant 10/ 10

    Home Builders Association of Central VA
    Local # 4827
    20334 Timberlake Rd Ste 3
    Lynchburg, VA 24502

    Alberta Virginia Building Consultant 10/ 10


    Building Consultant News and Information
    For Alberta Virginia


    Additional Insurance Coverage Determined for General Contractor

    “Rip and Tear” Damage Remains Covered Under CGL Policy as “Accident”—for Now.

    Employees Versus Independent Contractors

    One World Trade Center Tallest Building in US

    Additional Insured Not Entitled to Coverage for Post-Completion Defects

    Bad Faith in the First Party Insurance Context

    Insurer’s Motion for Summary Judgment Based on Earth Movement Exclusion Denied

    Judge Rejects Extrapolation, Harmon Tower to Remain Standing

    New Zealand Using Plywood Banned Elsewhere

    No Coverage For Damage Caused by Chinese Drywall

    Statutes of Limitations May be the Colorado Contractors’ Friend

    Ireland Said to Plan Home Loans Limits to Prevent Bubble

    Contractor Sued for Contract Fraud by Government

    State Farm to Build Multi-Use Complex in Dallas Area

    Is Arbitration Final and Binding?

    Things You Didn't Know About Your Homeowners Policy

    “Bee” Careful: Unique Considerations When Negotiating a Bee Storage Lease Agreement

    TOLLING AGREEMENTS: Construction Defect Lawyers use them to preserve Association Warranty Claims during Construction Defect Negotiations with Developers

    In Supreme Court Showdown, California Appeals Courts Choose Sides Regarding Whether Right to Repair Act is Exclusive Remedy for Homeowners

    April Rise in Construction Spending Not That Much

    Travelers’ 3rd Circ. Win Curbs Insurers’ Asbestos Exposure

    Ohio Supreme Court Holds No Occurence Arises from Subcontractor's Faulty Workmanship

    Second Circuit Denies Petitions for Review of EPA’s Final Regulations to Establish Requirements for Cooling Water Intake Structures

    Federal Judge Dismisses Insurance Coverage Lawsuit In Construction Defect Case

    Damage to Plaintiffs' Home Caused By Unmoored Boats Survives Surface Water Exclusion

    Fannie Overseer Moves to Rescue Housing With Lower Risk to Lenders

    Prison Contractors Did Not Follow the Law

    Window Manufacturer Weathers Recession by Diversifying

    California Supreme Court Endorses City Authority to Adopt Inclusionary Housing Ordinance

    Consultant’s Corner: Why Should Construction Business Owners Care about Cyber Liability Insurance?

    Illinois Town’s Bond Sale Halted Over Fraudulent Hotel Deals

    Happy Thanksgiving from CDJ

    The Burden of Betterment

    Northern District of Mississippi Finds That Non-Work Property Damages Are Not Subject to AIA’s Waiver of Subrogation Clause

    Ensuing Loss Provision Does Not Salvage Coverage

    Manhattan to Get Tall, Skinny Tower

    Where Did That Punch List Term Come From Anyway?

    Approaches to Managing Job Site Inventory

    6,500 Bridges in Ohio Allegedly Functionally Obsolete or Structurally Deficient

    The Great Skyscraper Comeback Skips North America

    Hawaii Court of Appeals Remands Bad Faith Claim Against Title Insurer

    What Buyers Want in a Green Home—and What They Don’t

    Did the Court of Appeals Just Raise the Bar for California Contractors to Self-Report Construction-Related Judgments?

    Bert L. Howe & Associates Brings Professional Development Series to Their San Antonio Office

    What is the Implied Warranty of Habitability?

    Construction Laborers Sue Contractors Over Wage Theft

    Tightest Credit Market in 16 Years Rejects Bernanke’s Bid

    Embattled SNC-Lavalin Files Ethics Appeal, Realigns Structure

    Toll Brothers Shows how the Affluent Buyer is Driving Up Prices

    Best Lawyers Recognizes Fifteen White and Williams Lawyers
    Corporate Profile

    ALBERTA VIRGINIA BUILDING CONSULTANT
    DIRECTORY AND CAPABILITIES

    The Alberta, Virginia Building Consultant Group at BHA, leverages from the experience gained through more than 5,500 construction related expert witness designations encompassing a wide spectrum of construction related disputes. Leveraging from this considerable body of experience, BHA provides construction related trial support and expert services to Alberta's most recognized construction litigation practitioners, commercial general liability carriers, owners, construction practice groups, as well as a variety of state and local government agencies.

    Building Consultant News & Info
    Alberta, Virginia

    South Carolina Clarifies the Accrual Date for Its Statute of Repose

    March 18, 2019 —
    In Lawrence v. General Panel Corp., 2019 S.C. LEXIS 1, No. 27856 (S.C. Jan. 1, 2019), the Supreme Court of South Carolina answered a certified question related to South Carolina’s statute of repose, S.C. Code § 15-3-640,[1] to wit, whether the date of “substantial completion of the improvement” is always measured from the date on which the certificate of occupancy is issued. The court held that a 2005 amendment to § 15-3-640 did not change South Carolina law with respect to the date of substantial completion. Thus, under the revised version of § 15-3-640, “the statute of repose begins to run at the latest on the date of the certificate of occupancy, even if there is ongoing work on any particular part of the project.” A brief review of prior case law may assist with understanding the court’s ruling in Lawrence. In Ocean Winds Corp. of Johns Island v. Lane, 556 S.E.2d 377 (S.C. 2001), the Supreme Court of South Carolina addressed the question of whether § 15-3-640 ran from substantial completion of the installation of the windows at issue or on substantial completion of the building as a whole. Citing § 15-3-630(b),[2] the court found that the windows “were ‘a specified area or portion’ of the larger condominium project” and, upon their incorporation into the larger project they could be used for the purpose for which they were intended. Thus, the court held that “the statute of repose began running when installation of the windows was complete.” Read the court decision
    Read the full story...
    Reprinted courtesy of William L. Doerler, White and Williams
    Mr. Doerler may be contacted at doerlerw@whiteandwilliams.com

    Thanks for the Super Lawyers Nod for 2019!

    May 20, 2019 —
    It is with humility and a sense of accomplishment that I announce that I have been selected for the third straight year to the Virginia Super Lawyers in the Construction Litigation category for 2019. Add this to my recent election to the Virginia Legal Elite in Construction and I’ve had a pretty good year. As always, I am thrilled to be included on these peer elected lists. So without further ado, thank you to my peers and those on the panel at Virginia Super Lawyers for the great honor. I feel quite proud to be part of the 5% of Virginia attorneys that made this list for 2019. The full lists of Virginia Super Lawyers will appear in the May edition of Richmond Magazine. Please check it out. Read the court decision
    Read the full story...
    Reprinted courtesy of The Law Office of Christopher G. Hill
    Mr. Hill may be contacted at chrisghill@constructionlawva.com

    Three Reasons Lean Construction Principles Are Still Valid

    February 27, 2019 —
    When lean principles were first introduced to the construction industry five years ago, project managers raced to implement the production method. The internet was rife with content about how to easily overhaul a jobsite and transform it into the picture of efficiency. However, the number of lean construction critics have multiplied significantly in recent months. They claim concepts are near impossible to implement or, even worse, automation eliminates the need for deliberate human processes. These ideas are misleading. Lean principles are still valid for a few key reasons. 1. Lean involves seeing things from the customer’s point of view One of the defining principles of lean construction is understanding value from the customer’s point of view. The concept encourages stakeholders, including the owner, contractor and supplier, to come together during the early planning stage of the project. The significant level of trust created from this exercise can’t be replicated by machinery. It involves compassion, collaboration and a sense of creativity that artificial intelligence is yet to possess. Moreover, the rapport gained through this service-oriented exercise is worth the time investment. Reprinted courtesy of Kevin Clary, Construction Executive, a publication of Associated Builders and Contractors. All rights reserved. Read the court decision
    Read the full story...
    Reprinted courtesy of

    No Coverage for Faulty Workmanship Based Upon Exclusion for Contractual Assumption of Liability

    August 06, 2019 —
    The Supreme Court for West Virginia determined the policy's contractual assumption exclusion barred coverage for the general contractor based upon claims of faulty workmanship. J.A. St & Assocs. v. Bitco Gen. Ins. Corp., 2019 W. Va. LEXIS 205 (May 1, 2019). J.A. Street & Associates, Inc. entered a contract with the developer, Thundering Herd Development, L.L.C., to build a commercial shopping center on seventy-eight acres of land. Street agreed to oversee the site preparation for the development and the construction of many of the buildings. Thundering Herd retained an engineering firm, S&ME, Inc. to do geotechnical exploration and to provide advice regarding land preparation for the shopping center. Thundering Heard also entered an agreement with the Target Corporation to construct a store on a pad to be prepared at the shopping center. Street hired subcontractors to prepare the site by grading the land and installing fill material. A slope was constructed at the rear of the proposed Target site, but it failed, causing a landslide, damage to the pad, and damage to adjacent property owned by a third party. Thundering Heard incurred $721,875 in additional costs to repair this slope, reconstruct the Target site, and compensate the neighbor for the damage to the adjacent property. Read the court decision
    Read the full story...
    Reprinted courtesy of Tred R. Eyerly, Damon Key Leong Kupchak Hastert
    Mr. Eyerly may be contacted at te@hawaiilawyer.com

    No Coverage for Sink Hole Loss

    June 18, 2019 —
    The federal district court found there was no coverage under the commercial property policy for loss suffered by the insured condominium association due to a sink hole. Bahama Bay II Condo. Ass'n. v. Untied Nat'l Ins. Co., 2019 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 67487 (M.D. Fla. April 11, 2019). The plaintiff condominium association had thirteen buildings inside their complex. On December 9, 2016, a sinkhole appeared near Building 43. The building was vacated and declared unsafe. Plaintiff's board excused Building 43 owners from paying association dues. Plaintiff submitted a claim to the insurer for benefits under the policy. The insurer inspected and accepted coverage for Building 43 under the policy's Catastrophic Ground Cover Collapse (CGCC) provision and issued a check for $290,000 for immediate repairs. The insurer denied coverage for Buildings 42, 44, and 45; repairs to the foundation of all buildings, the retaining wall and outdoor fences; land, landscaping, and patios, uncollected association dues, and condominium unit owner property. Read the court decision
    Read the full story...
    Reprinted courtesy of Tred R. Eyerly, Damon Key Leong Kupchak Hastert
    Mr. Eyerly may be contacted at te@hawaiilawyer.com

    Women Make Their Mark on Construction Leadership

    April 22, 2019 —
    In the era of the Lean In movement and the Women’s March, women are finding their voices and using them. In politics, in the classroom and even on the playing field, women’s participation and leadership are breaking records. However, this is not the case in the board room—especialy in the C-suite. The Russell 3000 Index, a market index that benchmarks the U.S. Stock Market, found that only 9 percent of top executive positions were filled by women. The construction industry reflects this low participation of female executives. Women in construction only number 9 percent across the board of the industry. Seven percent of all construction executives are women and only 3 percent of the Fortune 500 construction companies have a female construction manager. Most are in sales and office roles (about 45 percent). Russell 3000 also found that women who are in the C-suite usually fill more HR- or administrative-related positions with very few in COO or CEO positions. Women in leadership need to have real decision making power to progress further. On the upside, women in construction tend to have less of a pay gap than other industries—about 5 percent compared to 20 percent. Though she be but little, She is Fierce Despite their small numbers, women executives in construction are paving the way for others to access leadership. In 1984, 11 women created Women Construction Owners and Executives, an organization for support and professional development. Their purpose is to promote women into leadership, assist women in executive positions and encourage more women to join the industry. The National Association of Women in Construction and Women in Construction Operations are also resources and networks with thousands of members. Reprinted courtesy of Annalisa Enrile & Oliver Ritchie, Construction Executive, a publication of Associated Builders and Contractors. All rights reserved. Read the court decision
    Read the full story...
    Reprinted courtesy of

    Breaking Down Homeowners Association Laws In California

    April 03, 2019 —
    Purpose of HOAs Property ownership often combines elements of individual and common ownership interests. For example, a property owner may individually own his or her living quarters, but also own a common interest in amenities that are considered too expensive for a single homeowner to purchase individually (such as a pool, gym, or trash collection service). Properties with such elements usually take the form of apartments, condominiums, planned developments, or stock cooperatives (together known as “common interest developments” or “CIDs”). Whenever a CID is built, California law requires the developer to organize a homeowner association (or “HOA), which can take several different names, including “community association”. Initially, the developer relies on the HOA to market the development to prospective buyers. Once each unit in the development is sold, management of the HOA is passed to a board of directors elected by the homeowners. At that point, the primary purpose of the HOA shifts to maintenance of common amenities and enforcement of community standards. Dues/Assessments HOAs generally charge each homeowner monthly or annual dues to cover the cost of their services. HOAs may also charge special assessments to cover large, abnormal expenses, such as the cost of upgrades or improvements. The amount charged in dues and assessments is established by the HOA’s board of directors, within the limits set by the HOA’s governing documents and California Civil Code section 1366. Section 1366 provides that HOA dues may not be increased by more than 20 percent of the amount set in the previous year, and the total amount of any special assessments charged in a given year generally may not exceed 5 percent of the HOA’s budgeted expenses. Read the court decision
    Read the full story...
    Reprinted courtesy of Lauren Hickey, Bremer Whyte Brown & O'Meara LLP

    Sixth Circuit Holds that Some Official Actions Taken in the “Flint Water Crisis” Could Be Constitutional Due Process Violations

    March 27, 2019 —
    In what the Court of Appeals describes as “the infamous government-created environmental disaster known at the Flint Water Crisis,” a panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit has ruled that some of the government personnel responsible for this disaster may be liable, under 42 U.S.C. § 1983, for monetary damages based on the Substantive Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution. The case is Guertin, et al., v. State of Michigan, et al., decided on January 4, 2019. On April 25, 2014, the City of Flint, MI, facing a financial crisis, agreed to switch its drinking water supply from the water provided by the Detroit Water and Sewerage Department to untreated water available from the Flint River that would be treated in the waterworks owned and operated by the City. However, the City waterworks could not provide the needed treatment, which resulted in the corrosive Flint River water leaching lead out of the old Flint water pipes. Soon thereafter, a public health and environmental crisis enveloped Flint. Many lawsuits have been filed against many defendants, and many civil and criminal investigations have been opened. Read the court decision
    Read the full story...
    Reprinted courtesy of Anthony B. Cavender, Pillsbury
    Mr. Cavender may be contacted at anthony.cavender@pillsburylaw.com